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Moving to A Colder Climate? Here's How You Can Acclimate to Body Temperature Changes

August 06, 2020

Moving to A Colder Climate? Here's How You Can Acclimate to Body Temperature Changes

Whether you’re moving to or vacationing in a colder climate, it’s important to properly acclimate your body to the cold weather you’ll be enduring. With the right tips and tricks, acclimatization is possible and will help prevent dramatic body temperature changes that can lead to injury and illness. 

Body Temperature Changes & How to Acclimate

Expose Yourself to Cold Environments

Anything that causes you to shiver will help your body acclimate to the cold. Dedicate a week or so before your trip to exposing yourself to the cold, allowing body temperature changes to take place. This can be accomplished by turning your a/c down a few more degrees, wearing fewer layers, or spending time outside in colder climates. 


Cold showers are a fast and easy way to create body temperature changes that help you acclimate. U.S. Army research physiologist John Castellani suggests exposing yourself to cold water as part of your normal shower routine for 15 seconds to start, adding 10 seconds every day. Once you’ve had enough for that shower, turn the water back up to warm.


Wear Heated Apparel

Once you’ve arrived at your cold-weather destination, gearing up with the right clothing is crucial to staying warm. Heated apparel makes acclimating to cold weather much easier without the risk of becoming too cold. Heated clothes can be worn with or without the heating elements engaged, making them versatile transition pieces that can be worn in variable weather conditions.

 Cold weather gear like wind and water-resistant heated vests and jackets are perfect layers to help you acclimate to colder temperatures, keeping you warm, dry, and able to warm up or cool down as needed. When you don’t need the extra warmth or you’d like to try acclimating on your own, simply turn off the heating elements and only turn them on when necessary. For long trips in the cold, consider packing winter accessories like extra battery packs and car chargers in case the cold is unbearable and you need to access the heating elements of your heated apparel.


If you suffer from health problems, we suggest consulting a doctor to find out if certain acclimatization measures are safe for you.


Whether you’re moving or just visiting a colder climate, acclimating your body to the cold weather will help prevent injury, illness, and letting the cold ruin your fun. Gobi Heat® heated apparel gives you the ability to pack light, pack smart, and pack warmth for when you need it most.

Happy Acclimating!






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